Integrating Quotes Lesson Plan

$1.99

A lesson plan that combines Colbert and Wheat Thins to teach one of the most difficult-to-teach skills in argumentative writing: smoothly integrating quotes and evidence.

Description

A lesson plan that combines Colbert and Wheat Thins to teach one of the most difficult-to-teach skills in argumentative writing: smoothly integrating quotes and evidence.
 
I GO CRAZY when students just slap a quote the middle of their writing with no intro and no analysis. Because I’ll just be innocently reading along and BAM. “80% of all teenagers say they love chicken.” And then the paper just continues on like nothing just happened. It’s as if you’re sitting in a meeting and then out of nowhere someone (aka, the quote) bursts into the room, word-vomits a random fact, and then disappears. Like, what? Another way of putting it: you can’t just throw bread, mayo, and meat onto the table and call it a sandwich. It’s just a collection of food.
This lesson takes students through identifying 4 parts of that quote “sandwich”:
  1. The lead-in statement (“According to…”)
  2. The quote
  3. The in-text citation
  4. The reasoning (or analysis)
Then uses a (miraculously politically-neutral) Colbert clip about a memo from Wheat Thins to show students examples of the quote sandwich in action.
 
No more sudden screaming of facts, only smoothly integrated quotes. We hope.
 
This lesson plan includes:
  • Content standards
  • Language standards
  • 1 detailed lesson plan
  • 1 Editable handout accompanying the lesson plan
  • Powerpoint slides for the lesson

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *